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Weight Loss Tips
Categories Everything

Weight Loss Tips For Pcos

PCOS or polycystic ovarian syndrome is referred to a condition in which cysts develop on the ovaries. Between 4-20% of women in their reproductive phase of life may suffer from this condition. This condition is characterised by hormonal imbalances, insulin resistance, inflammation, etc. All these together can make weight loss difficult, especially for those women who also have thyroid disorders. PCOS is also the leading cause of infertility in women.

Following are some tips for losing weight with PCOS:

  1. Reducing carbohydrate intake

PCOS is often associated with insulin resistance (35% to 80% cases). In insulin resistance, the cells of the body are unable to absorb glucose from blood in normal amounts, leading to high blood sugar levels. This in turn can lead to higher conversion of sugar to fat in the body and weight gain. Reducing simple carbohydrates intake can directly lead to lowering of insulin levels, thereby reducing carb conversion to fat. At the same time, consuming a low GI (glycemic index) diet reduces insulin resistance and fat storage around the belly area.

  1. Increase protein intake

Protein intake has been shown to improve blood sugar management by giving a feeling of fullness for longer. In addition, it also helps in losing weight. But remember that total protein intake should not exceed more than 40% of total calorie intake, as very high intakes can cause increased stress on the kidneys.

  1. Include nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are powerhouses of healthy fats, vitamins and minerals like omega 3 fatty acids, zinc, iron, selenium, etc. Seeds like pumpkin, sesame, flax and sunflower have been shown to bring about a balance between the reproductive hormones.

  1. Reduce sugar consumption

Refined sugar, jaggery, honey all are high calorie foods with high glycemic indices and thus should be avoided. Added sugars also increase weight and insulin resistance. Research also shows that women with PCOS have higher blood sugar spikes on ingestion of sugar as compared to women without PCOS.

  1. Get physically active

Exercise has been shown to help at multiple levels; be it weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity, better hormonal health, etc. Therefore it is important to invest at least 30-40 minutes daily for exercise.

  1. Get adequate sleep

Inadequate sleep increases levels of hormones like cortisol and ghrelin, that increase the feeling of hunger. It also leads to increased inflammation in the body. Our bodies carry out repair of damaged muscles and detoxification while we are asleep. Thus getting enough sleep is an important part of not just your weight loss, but also your health journey.

If you have PCOS and would like to lose weight, or improve your fertility, and are looking for help in planning and meal prep ideas, contact Kanupriya Khanna, one of the best Dietitian and Nutritionist in Delhi.

Dietitian and Nutritionist in Delhi
Categories Everything

Here’S How Stress Causes Weight Gain

The fast paced world that we live in today, where prices are sky rocketing and there’s less job security, it is difficult to stay completely stress free. With less time on our hands to cook fresh nutritious meals, we tend to rely more and more on pre-cooked foods, take aways and dine ins. This in turn leads to weight gain. With more and more people struggling with their weight and being diagnosed with various life style diseases, it is imperative to understand the relationship between stress, weight loss and weight gain.

There are various ways in which stress plays a major role in your weight gain journey:

  1. Cortisol and weight gain

Cortisol is also known as the stress or “fight and flight” hormone. Every time one is experiencing stress, the adrenal glands release cortisol. Cortisol slows down the metabolism, increases blood pressure and insulin production. Increased insulin production leads to the lowering of blood sugar, which in turn triggers a carving for fatty and sugary foods.

  1. Adrenaline

Acute stress typically leads to the production of the hormone adrenaline. Adrenaline in turn decreases one’s appetite in the short term. However, during prolonged chronic stress, the effect of adrenaline gets negated by the effect of cortisol, which urges your brain to send a signal to eat.

  1. Sleep deprivation

Stress can lead to disturbed sleep or poor quality of sleep. Sleep deprivation has been shown to affect the production of the hormone leptin, which is the satiety hormone and tells our barin to stop eating. On the other hand, insufficient sleep also increases the hormone ghrelin that is responsible for the feeling of hunger, so one may tend to overeat.

  1. Mental health

Emotional eating is a well-documented psychological term associated with eating foods to bring about a feeling of happiness without a physiological need of the body for energy. A person who is stressed and depressed is more prone to indulge in emotional eating, especially of so-called comfort foods like chocolates, chips, etc.

On the flip side, prolonged stress and depression causes feelings of lethargy, anxiety, weakness, etc; all of which make it difficult for one to eat balanced meals, exercise and low self-esteem. As a combined effect, a person tends to gain weight.

  1. Skipping meals

On stressful days it is quite easy to skip meals. Unfortunately one does not lose weight by skipping meals. This is because skipping a meal can make one so hungry later on that one tends to eat whatever is easily available in the least amount of time, for eg: fast foods, etc. If this happens repeatedly, it will lead to weight gain.

If you would like to lose weight and are looking for help in planning and meal prep ideas, contact Kanupriya Khanna, one of the best Dietitian and Nutritionist in Delhi.

Categories Pregnancy nutrition

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

 

“Eating for two” is a common phrase, but what does it truly mean for pregnant women? Although it may appear that pregnancy is an excuse to eat as much as you want, getting the right amount of calories and nutrients is essential for a healthy pregnancy.

The following guide for what to eat, how much to eat, and when to opt for a supplement, can help pave the way to good health during pregnancy.

Counting Calories for Pregnancy

While there are exceptions, many women are shocked to hear that during the first trimester of pregnancy, no additional calories are required. However, by the second trimester, an expectant mother requires an extra 250-300 calories per day. That’s around the same as one or two more snacks. You may require an additional 450 calories per day during the third trimester, which is equivalent to one additional small meal.

Weight gain is natural and encouraged during pregnancy, while losing weight is not recommended. The recommendations below, based on the Institute of Medicine’s guidelines, indicate how much weight gain is considered healthy, based on a mother’s pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). But, as always, it’s important to consult with your dietitian before making any major changes to your diet:

  • Underweight (BMI <18.5): Weight gain of 12 – 18kgs (28-40 lbs.)
  • Normal (BMI 18.5-24.9): Weight gain of 11- 15kgs (25-35 lbs.)
  • Overweight (BMI 25-29.9): Weight gain of 6-11kgs (15-25 lbs.)
  • Obese (BMI 30+): Weight gain of 5-9kgs (11-20 lbs.)
  • Pregnant with twins: Weight gain of 11-20kgs (25-45 lbs.)

Important Nutrients for Pregnant Women

The following are six nutrients that expectant mothers should consume to promote a healthy pregnancy and birth.

  1. Folate

Folate has been identified as a critical nutrient for foetal growth by healthcare professionals over the years. Folate is required for the development of the foetal brain and spinal cord, and deficits can result in neural tube abnormalities. In fact, before conceiving, women should make sure they are getting adequate folate.

Foods including legumes, nuts and seeds, eggs, leafy greens, broccoli, and many other fruits and vegetables, as well as supplements, should provide at least 600 micrograms (mcg) of folate per day. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant or expecting, talk to your doctor about folic acid.

  1. Iron

Iron is a mineral that aids in the transport of oxygen to the mothers’ and foetus’ organs and tissues. During pregnancy, both the mother and the baby’s blood volume expands, and their iron requirements nearly treble. For pregnant women, a daily iron dose of 27 mg is suggested. Pulses, lentils, leafy greens, nuts and seeds, and fortified grains are all good sources of iron, but doctors recommend taking an iron-supplement as well. Vitamin C-rich foods, such as citrus fruits, peppers, strawberries, can enhance iron absorption when combined with iron-rich diets or supplements.

  1. Calcium

Calcium is essential for foetal bone and skeletal development, as well as maternal bone health. A baby will draw calcium from the mother’s stores if the mother’s diet is deficient in calcium, which might damage the mother’s bones. The daily calcium need for expecting mothers is 1,000 mg, which can be met by eating 3-4 cups of dairy each day. Calcium can also be found in soy products, broccoli, tinned salmon, dark leafy greens, and sardines. Also, divide your calcium intake. To enhance absorption, take no more than 500 mg at a time. This vital nutrient is also available in supplement form.

  1. Vitamin D

Though a mother’s vitamin D needs do not increase during pregnancy it is important to maintain adequate intake. Vitamin D works in conjunction with calcium for the development of fetal bones and skeletal system. The vitamin D recommendation for pregnant women is 600 international units (IU) a day or 15 mcg, which you can get from the sun, fortified milk, fatty fish, eggs, or from a supplement.

  1. Choline

The American Medical Association (AMA) has found that choline may help with brain and spinal cord maturation during pregnancy. Choline is found naturally in animal products, eggs, beans and most nuts. According to the National Institutes of Health, this vitamin is frequently included to baby formulae also, because of its significant health advantages.

  1. Fiber

Constipation affects many pregnant women at some point throughout their pregnancy. Consume enough of fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains to avoid it. Drink plenty of water and get between 25 and 30 gm of fibre every day.

Every stage of life necessitates proper nutrition, but pregnancy and the months afterwards entail special dietary requirements for both women and kids. You and your baby have the best chance of being happy and healthy, not just during pregnancy, but also afterwards; if you eat a well-balanced diet and drink enough of water.

For expert advice, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian holding more than 17 years of experience in child nutrition. Because of her sheer involvement in making a difference in people’s life by inculcating healthy food habits and lifestyle, Kanupriya Khanna is ranked as one of the best dietitians in Delhi. (Dietary needs of Children During the Pandemic 🙂

 

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