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Health Benefits of Quinoa
Categories Other nutrition blog

Health Advantages of Quinoa

Quinoa is a sort of edible seed that comes in a variety of hues, including black, red, yellow, and white. The plant is native to the Andean region of South America, notably Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, and Peru, and has been cultivated for over 5000 years. The natural saponins, a bitter-tasting chemical component coating the exterior of the seeds that functions as a natural insecticide, is removed after they are collected.

Quinoa, often described as a “superfood” or a “super grain,” has become popular among the health conscious, with good reason. It is also gluten-free and suitable for those following a gluten-free diet.

Quinoa is often used as a rice substitute, but it is actually a seed. It is commonly mistaken for a grain and is referred to as such. Quinoa is soft and fluffy when cooked, with a somewhat nutty flavour. It can be processed into flour, flakes, and a variety of dishes like pasta and bread.

According to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, the boom in quinoa demand has pushed production outside South America to more than 70 countries. Quinoa crops are being grown on a huge scale in China, North America, France, and India.

Quinoa seeds can be black, red, white, purple, pink, yellow, gray, orange, green or yellow.

Quinoa has a high protein, fiber, iron, copper, thiamin, and vitamin B6 content. It’s also a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, and folate. “A ‘good source’ implies that one serving delivers at least 10% of the daily value of that nutrient, while an ‘excellent source’ means that one serving provides at least 20% of the daily value of that nutrient.”

Quinoa’s “unique composition and outstanding balance” of protein, oil, and fat, as well as its minerals, fatty acids, antioxidants, and vitamins, make it a very nutritious food, according to a 2009 paper in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. Quinoa, unlike many other plant foods, contains phytohormones. Because they occasionally act like estrogens in the body, phytoestrogens are being explored as a treatment for menopause symptoms.

Quinoa’s health advantages

1. An all-around protein

Quinoa is well known for being one of the few plant foods that provide complete proteins, with all essential amino acids in a healthy balance. Complete proteins include all of the essential amino acids in about equal amounts, which the body cannot manufacture on its own.

2. Anti-inflammatory benefits

Quinoa may help decrease the presence of inflammation. It helps promote healthy gut microbes (the friendly bacteria in the gut), which are important for preventing obesity, inflammation and disease.

3. Free of gluten

People with Celiac disease, a severe gluten intolerance, are advised to follow gluten-free diets. Quinoa is an excellent choice for such people or those who have gluten intolerance, IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), etc.

4. Heart health

Lowering LDL cholesterol is good for your heart, but quinoa can benefit your heart in other ways as well. A study published in the Journal of Food Lipids noted that quinoa seeds possess many of the dietary flavonoids “shown to inversely correlate with mortality from heart disease.” Triglyceride levels reduced by an average 12.7 per cent among the participants who ate 50g, according to the findings. If you eat 50 grams of quinoa, which is four tablespoons daily, your risk of cardiovascular disease can decrease significantly.

5. Digestion

One cup of cooked quinoa offers 21% of the daily fiber recommendation, which is fantastic for your gut. Quinoa is also easier to digest than many other grains. Furthermore, one feels fuller after eating quinoa, in comparison to eating wheat or rice, according to a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

6. Hypertension and diabetes

Quinoa has also been examined for its role in diabetes and hypertension control. A study investigated 10 traditional Peruvian grains and legumes for their potential in controlling the early stages of Type 2 diabetes.  The study found that as Quinoa is one of the most protein rich foods with almost twice as much fiber as many other grains; is loaded with potassium and magnesium, it can be extremely beneficial in diabetes and hypertension control. Not only does quinoa help normalize blood pressure, blood sugar and triglyceride levels, it’s a great food for weight loss as well!

 

In case you need a professional help, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian, having more than 18 years of experience. She is one of the best dietitians in Delhi if you are looking for nutritional advice

diet elimination
Categories Other nutrition blog

What is the term “diet elimination”?

The majority of diets are intended to assist you in losing weight or improving your health. An elimination diet is not the same as a regular diet. This plan’s purpose is to help you feel better by identifying the foods that make you unwell.

What Is an Elimination Diet and How Does It Work?

Though there are various forms of elimination diets, they all work on the same principle: you stop eating particular items for a few weeks and then gradually reintroduce them one by one. This method can be used to detect food allergies, sensitivities, or intolerances that could cause unpleasant reactions.

“Reintroduction” is the next step. During this phase, you’ll gradually reintroduce foods to your diet while keeping track of your symptoms. Other tests may be performed by your doctor to determine which foods are causing your problems.

Once you and your doctor have identified the items that are causing your symptoms, you and your doctor can devise a new eating plan to help you avoid them.

People with a range of health issues linked to dietary reactions may benefit from an elimination diet.

To discover if certain foods are producing symptoms, consider an exclusion diet, such as:

• Bloating, gas, indigestion, or other stomach problems

• Joint pain

• Fatigue

• Headaches

• Frequent colds or immune system problems might cause brain fog.

• Anxiety, depression, or mood swings

Because this diet is so complicated, it’s critical to follow it safely and precisely.

An elimination diet should only be followed under the supervision of a medical practitioner.

What Are the Health Benefits of Following an Elimination Diet?

An elimination diet can assist you in determining which foods are making you feel ill. For folks with food allergies or intolerances, this might be a game changer.

Food allergies are on the rise, according to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). Food allergies affect around 32 million people in the United States, including 5.6 million children under the age of 18.

An elimination diet can also help with the symptoms of various medical disorders that are prompted by food allergies. Here are a few examples:

• Other gastrointestinal illnesses such as Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal illness that causes symptoms such as diarrhoea, cramps, stomach pain, gas, and constipation. Elimination diets have been shown to assist some persons with IBS minimise their symptoms.

• Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neuropsychiatric condition that affects roughly 7% of children and adolescents in the United States. An exclusion diet was successful in lowering symptoms for 30% of children with ADHD, according to a study published in BMC Psychiatry in 2020.

• Migraine is a neurological disorder marked by recurrent episodes of symptoms, most commonly debilitating headaches, that can have a negative influence on a person’s quality of life. Participants on an exclusion diet reduced their number of headaches from nine to six in a 2010 research.

• certain foods have been shown to exacerbate the symptoms of various diseases, particularly autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. An elimination diet can be used to treat a variety of health problems.

Effects of Weight Loss

An elimination “diet,” despite its name, is not intended to help you lose weight. In fact, for many people, eliminating foods or entire dietary groups makes calorie restriction more difficult.

On the other hand, some people with food allergies who follow an exclusion diet may feel better and lose weight, but this is unlikely to be due to the diet itself.

An elimination diet should be avoided by anyone with a history of eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia, as it may induce dangerous behaviours.

Elimination Diets (Examples)

An elimination diet can be done in a variety of ways. Some plans have greater limitations than others. For example, you may need to eliminate just one suspected item, or you may need to exclude six or more foods.

The amount of foods you eliminate will be determined by your symptoms, probable triggers, motivation, and other variables. The most restricted elimination diets usually produce the best outcomes.

These foods are not included in the famous six-food exclusion diet:

• Milk, yoghurt, cheese, butter, and ice cream are examples of dairy products.

• Wheat-based foods like flour, bran, and gluten may be restricted.

• Eggs and egg-based condiments, such as mayonnaise and salad dressings, are common triggers.

• Edamame, soy sauce, and tofu are all soy-based goods.

• Peanuts and tree nuts are the most common culprits to avoid.

• Shellfish is one of the most prevalent food allergens.

The following foods are typically prohibited on an elimination diet:

• Citrus-based foods it’s possible that oranges or grapefruits are on your list of fruits to avoid.

• a few vegetables Tomatoes and peppers are frequently left out.

• Sweeteners made from artificial sources you may need to eliminate aspartame and other artificial sweeteners from your diet.

• Oils Certain oils and dairy-based butters may need to be avoided.

• Beans, peas, and all soy-based items fall into this category.

• Sugars it’s possible that candy and sweets will be limited.

• Other spices and extracts, as well as caffeine and alcohol, may need to be avoided.

In case you need a professional help, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian, holding more than 18 years of experience in child nutrition. She is one of the best dietitians in Delhi if you are looking for nutritional advice for children.

Categories Pregnancy nutrition

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

 

“Eating for two” is a common phrase, but what does it truly mean for pregnant women? Although it may appear that pregnancy is an excuse to eat as much as you want, getting the right amount of calories and nutrients is essential for a healthy pregnancy.

The following guide for what to eat, how much to eat, and when to opt for a supplement, can help pave the way to good health during pregnancy.

Counting Calories for Pregnancy

While there are exceptions, many women are shocked to hear that during the first trimester of pregnancy, no additional calories are required. However, by the second trimester, an expectant mother requires an extra 250-300 calories per day. That’s around the same as one or two more snacks. You may require an additional 450 calories per day during the third trimester, which is equivalent to one additional small meal.

Weight gain is natural and encouraged during pregnancy, while losing weight is not recommended. The recommendations below, based on the Institute of Medicine’s guidelines, indicate how much weight gain is considered healthy, based on a mother’s pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). But, as always, it’s important to consult with your dietitian before making any major changes to your diet:

  • Underweight (BMI <18.5): Weight gain of 12 – 18kgs (28-40 lbs.)
  • Normal (BMI 18.5-24.9): Weight gain of 11- 15kgs (25-35 lbs.)
  • Overweight (BMI 25-29.9): Weight gain of 6-11kgs (15-25 lbs.)
  • Obese (BMI 30+): Weight gain of 5-9kgs (11-20 lbs.)
  • Pregnant with twins: Weight gain of 11-20kgs (25-45 lbs.)

Important Nutrients for Pregnant Women

The following are six nutrients that expectant mothers should consume to promote a healthy pregnancy and birth.

  1. Folate

Folate has been identified as a critical nutrient for foetal growth by healthcare professionals over the years. Folate is required for the development of the foetal brain and spinal cord, and deficits can result in neural tube abnormalities. In fact, before conceiving, women should make sure they are getting adequate folate.

Foods including legumes, nuts and seeds, eggs, leafy greens, broccoli, and many other fruits and vegetables, as well as supplements, should provide at least 600 micrograms (mcg) of folate per day. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant or expecting, talk to your doctor about folic acid.

  1. Iron

Iron is a mineral that aids in the transport of oxygen to the mothers’ and foetus’ organs and tissues. During pregnancy, both the mother and the baby’s blood volume expands, and their iron requirements nearly treble. For pregnant women, a daily iron dose of 27 mg is suggested. Pulses, lentils, leafy greens, nuts and seeds, and fortified grains are all good sources of iron, but doctors recommend taking an iron-supplement as well. Vitamin C-rich foods, such as citrus fruits, peppers, strawberries, can enhance iron absorption when combined with iron-rich diets or supplements.

  1. Calcium

Calcium is essential for foetal bone and skeletal development, as well as maternal bone health. A baby will draw calcium from the mother’s stores if the mother’s diet is deficient in calcium, which might damage the mother’s bones. The daily calcium need for expecting mothers is 1,000 mg, which can be met by eating 3-4 cups of dairy each day. Calcium can also be found in soy products, broccoli, tinned salmon, dark leafy greens, and sardines. Also, divide your calcium intake. To enhance absorption, take no more than 500 mg at a time. This vital nutrient is also available in supplement form.

  1. Vitamin D

Though a mother’s vitamin D needs do not increase during pregnancy it is important to maintain adequate intake. Vitamin D works in conjunction with calcium for the development of fetal bones and skeletal system. The vitamin D recommendation for pregnant women is 600 international units (IU) a day or 15 mcg, which you can get from the sun, fortified milk, fatty fish, eggs, or from a supplement.

  1. Choline

The American Medical Association (AMA) has found that choline may help with brain and spinal cord maturation during pregnancy. Choline is found naturally in animal products, eggs, beans and most nuts. According to the National Institutes of Health, this vitamin is frequently included to baby formulae also, because of its significant health advantages.

  1. Fiber

Constipation affects many pregnant women at some point throughout their pregnancy. Consume enough of fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains to avoid it. Drink plenty of water and get between 25 and 30 gm of fibre every day.

Every stage of life necessitates proper nutrition, but pregnancy and the months afterwards entail special dietary requirements for both women and kids. You and your baby have the best chance of being happy and healthy, not just during pregnancy, but also afterwards; if you eat a well-balanced diet and drink enough of water.

For expert advice, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian holding more than 17 years of experience in child nutrition. Because of her sheer involvement in making a difference in people’s life by inculcating healthy food habits and lifestyle, Kanupriya Khanna is ranked as one of the best dietitians in Delhi. (Dietary needs of Children During the Pandemic 🙂

 

Categories Nutrition Blogs, Pregnancy nutrition

Role of Diet in IUGR (Intra Uterine Growth Retardation)

Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) refers to a condition when the baby in the womb does not grow as expected. It means the baby is not growing at a normal rate inside the womb and is not as big as it is expected to be during each stage of the mother’s pregnancy.

The two types of intrauterine growth restriction or (IUGR) are:

• Symmetrical IUGR: a condition when all parts of the baby’s body are collectively small in size
• Asymmetrical IUGR: a condition when the baby’s head and brain have grown in the expected size, whereas the rest of the baby’s body is still small.

IUGR Causes

IUGR has many possible causes. It can happen if:-

• There is a problem with the placenta – the tissue that joins the mother and fetus.
• There is a problem with the blood flow in the umbilical cord, which connects the baby to the placenta.

Studies also reveal that under nutrition, over nutrition, and improper diet composition impact the growth of the fetus. Conversely, the increased prevalence of processed food/junk food/ alcohol that results in overweight and obesity are considered additional factors for IUGR.

What’s more? The risk of IUGR is higher if the mother has certain health problems such as:

• Diabetes
• High blood pressure
• Heart disease
• Kidney disease
• Lung disease etc

Diet in IUGR (Intra Uterine Growth Retardation)

Nutrition plays an important role in the first few months of pregnancy. And eating a balanced diet can go a long way in preventing IUGR. Sometimes when IUGR is due to an inherent problem with the uterus, a proper guided diet plan can help in the following:

• baby’s birth weight can be brought as near normal as possible even though the baby may need to be delivered prematurely
• shorter NICU stay of the infant

For healthy growth and development of the baby, you can follow the below pregnancy nutrition plan.

• All fresh fruits and juices. Ensure you include at least one citrus fruit
Daily Serving: 3-4 (approx)

• Freshly cooked vegetables
Daily Serving: 3-5 (approx)

• Dairy Products: Milk, yogurt, cheese
Daily Serving: 3 (approx)

• Whole grain bread and flour, cereals, crackers
Daily Serving: 3 (approx)

• Lean meat, chicken, fish with low mercury content
Daily Serving: 1 (approx)

• Water: Drink atleast 7-8 glasses of water daily.

In addition, ensure you maintain a moderate weight. If you are too thin or skinny, gaining as little as 4-5 pounds can sometimes be enough to jumpstart your pregnancy phase.

However, if you are wondering how to put all these to good use – contact Kanupriya Khanna. She has had a lot of experience with IUGR babies, not just during gestation but also post-delivery. She will not only help you create innovative food recipes but will also help you maintain the right balance of nutrients in your daily diet during pregnancy.

You can also visit the website https://www.kanupriyakhanna.in/ for nutrition tips and healthy diet plans

Categories Pregnancy nutrition, Recipe

Tea, Coffee….Pregnancy

 

Women, during pregnancy often complaint to me about them missing their daily tea or coffee as they understand that caffeine should be completely avoided. On this, I would like to state that while women of course need to watch out for their caffeine intake, moderate amounts of tea and coffee may be consumed during pregnancy.

Caffeine is a stimulant and a diuretic that can cross the placenta to the baby. A baby in the womb cannot fully metabolism caffeine leading to changes in the baby’s sleep pattern or normal movement pattern in the later stages of pregnancy. High levels of caffeine intake during pregnancy can result in babies having a low birth weight, that can lead to development of lifestyle diseases in later life. It can also lead to miscarriages. Hence, during pregnancy, it is very important to keep the total caffeine intake to less that 200mg per day.

Read More Tea, Coffee….Pregnancy

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