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Categories Dietician for children

Lactose Intolerance 

Lactose Intolerance 

Lactose intolerance is a type of reaction to lactose present in cow’s milk or formula manufactured from it that you or your child may experience. This occurs when our bodies are unable to digest lactose, a natural sugar found in milk. Lactose intolerance affects over 70% of the world’s population. People from Asian, African, and Hispanic ethnic groupings are more likely to have it.

Lactose Intolerance Symptoms

Lactose intolerance has certain symptoms that are comparable to those of a cow’s milk protein allergy. Digestion issues such as belly aches and bloating may be among them. Diarrhoea can also be a symptom.

 A lactose intolerance test, which evaluates blood sugar levels before and after drinking a lactose solution drink, may be given to confirm the intolerance.

If the test reveals lactose intolerance, you will most likely be directed to a dietician, who will advise you on appropriate meals and beverages. To ensure normal growth and development, babies and young children require the right nutrition. If your baby is bottle-fed and has lactose sensitivity, your doctor will probably recommend switching to lactose-free formula milk. Lactose replacement drops, which make it easier for your infant to digest lactose in breast milk, may aid if you’re nursing. For many babies and young children, lactose intolerance is only transitory. Within a few weeks or months, their symptoms will usually improve. It’s safe to gradually reintroduce milk and dairy into their diet at this time.

How Do You Deal With Lactose Intolerance?

When a child is diagnosed with lactose intolerance, the symptoms are relieved by avoiding milk and other dairy products. Those with primary lactose intolerance, on the other hand, have various degrees of lactase insufficiency and can tolerate varying levels of dietary lactose. Lactose-intolerant youngsters (and their parents) should be aware that symptoms caused by dairy products are usually temporary and do not cause harm to the gastrointestinal tract (as compared with celiac disease or allergic reactions, including milk-protein intolerance that can lead to ongoing inflammation and mucosal damage). Despite the fact that lactose malabsorption does not predispose to calcium malabsorption, avoiding milk products to alleviate symptoms may be detrimental to proper bone mineralization. It’s been proven that children who don’t drink milk get less calcium than they need for appropriate bone calcium accretion and mineralization.

Beyond infancy, lactose-free alternatives to cow milk based on rice, soy, or other proteins are widely accessible, albeit the nutritious content of most of these milks is not comparable to cow milk. Lactose is present in other mammalian milks, including goat milk. Tolerance to milk products may be partial, so some people may be able to avoid symptoms by simply changing their diet. Lactose in little doses, spaced throughout the day and ingested with other foods, may be tolerated in some cases, without causing discomfort. Because the bacteria in yogurt convert the lactose into lactic acid before intake, many lactose-intolerant individuals who are intolerant of milk can consume yoghurt. Furthermore, the semisolid nature of yoghurt reduces gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit, resulting in less lactose intolerance symptoms.

Aged cheeses have a lower lactose content than other cheeses and may be better tolerated as a result. Finally, oral lactase replacement capsules or lactase-enhanced milk or dairy products are widely available, allowing lactose-intolerant people to consume some or all milk products without restriction. Because the vitamin D amount of milk substitutes vary, labels must be verified to ensure that each brand’s vitamin D content is accurate.

Lactose-Free Formulas

Low-lactose and lactose-free formulas have no clinical advantages over standard lactose-containing formulas in developed countries, even in the case of acute gastroenteritis, because enough lactose digestion and absorption is preserved, except in severely undernourished children, in whom lactose-containing formulas may worsen diarrhoea and lactose-free formulas may be advantageous. In all circumstances, human milk should be continued for breastfed newborns. Despite the widespread availability and popularity of lactose-free cow milk–protein-based formulas, no research has shown that they have any therapeutic influence on infant outcome indicators such as colic, growth, or development.

Calcium Absorption and Bone Mineral Content Lactose, Calcium Absorption, and Bone Mineral Content

Recent research suggests that dietary lactose improves calcium absorption and that lactose-free diets decrease calcium absorption. Lactose intolerance (and lactose-free diets) may thus predispose to insufficient bone mineralization, a condition now identified in a variety of other paediatric illnesses. The long-term effects of lactose-free diets on bone mineral content and the risk of fractures and osteoporosis as people age have yet to be determined. Protein intake, vitamin D status, salt intake, hereditary and other factors all affect calcium homeostasis, making long-term research necessary to assess the hazards of each or all of these to bone health. Recent research suggests that genetic testing may one day be effective for detecting those at risk of lactase deficiency and, as a result, decreased bone mineral density, allowing for early management with dietary changes or nutrient supplementation.

Summary

Lactose intolerance has been recognised as a frequent condition in many children and people around the world for many years. Despite the fact that lactose intolerance is rarely life-threatening, its symptoms can cause severe discomfort, interrupted quality of life, and loss of school attendance, leisure and sports activities, and work time, all at a cost to individuals, families, and society. Treatment is straightforward and focuses on lowering or eliminating lactose, from the diet or “predigesting” it with supplemental lactase-enzyme replacement. Calcium must be obtained from nondairy sources or as a dietary supplement to avoid indolence.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 18 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advise and the right kind of diet. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

child diet
Categories Children Diet

Using Food Play to Encourage Picky Eaters

I know how difficult it may be to have fussy eaters at home; not just as a mother, but also as a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition. We simply want our children to eat, meet their nutritional needs, and quit being finicky eaters. So, how can we make mealtimes more fun and stimulate the consumption of new foods? Play with food!

Food play has gotten a bad reputation in the past.

“Don’t mess with your food!” 

“Use your fork and spoon!” 

“Don’t spit out your meal!” 

Such instructions don’t help, and I’m here to tell you why.

1.  We employ all five senses to eat, so it’s a whole sensory experience. We can help our children become accustomed to new foods by allowing them to use all of their senses. Touching, smelling, listening, feeling, and finally tasting our food are all important aspects of eating. We eat with all of our senses, which is particularly crucial for children and helps them to become more familiar with these foods.

2.  It’s not just about trying something new when it comes to eating; it’s about having interactions and exposures that brings our children closer to eating those foods. According to research, the more we allow our children to interact with different foods, textures, tastes and smells; the more comfortable they will get with these foods.

3. Taking a bite and eating a new meal can be intimidating. However, touching, smelling, or even licking that meal may not be as frightening. It has been proven that encouraging these stimuli leads to children liking new foods. Allowing children to spit their food out can be beneficial. We’re showing them that it’s alright if they don’t like the food right away, and that they can spit that bite onto their plate. This can help children feel more at ease with new foods.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advice. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

For more information about the same do visit   https://kanupriyakhanna.in/

Categories Children Diet, Nutrition Blogs

Add Zinc in Your Child’s Diet Plan

Zinc is known to be a powerhouse nutrient. It’s an important mineral for fighting off illness, keeping your heart and liver healthy, preventing digestive issues, and even growing muscles.
Zinc is basically a trace element that is necessary for a healthy immune system. It assists with the function, creation, and repair of our DNA – the building blocks for every cell in the body.

Zinc deficiency in children can lead to growth impediments and increased risk of infection. Hence it’s important to include zinc in your child’s diet plan, in order to contribute to the overall development of your child’s health.

How to Get Enough Zinc
Normally, zinc deficiency is due to insufficient dietary intake. In order to meet this need, you need to serve your child a balanced diet that includes zinc-rich foods.

Here is a list of food items that’s rich in zinc:

Shellfish: E.g. Oysters, prawns, crabs, mussels and shrimp can all contribute to your daily zinc needs.

Fish: Sardines, salmon

Meat: Chicken and turkey

Dairy Foods: Milk, yogurt, cheese – especially ricotta

Nuts and Seeds: Cashews, walnut, peanuts, pumpkin seeds

Beans: Green beans, kidney beans, baked beans, chickpeas

Vegetables: Mushrooms, spinach, broccoli, asparagus, kale, onions, ginger, garlic

Your food choices do impact your body. Hence it’s important to prepare a proper nutrition plan for kids as well. However, if you are facing difficulties in making proper food choices, ensure you consult a child nutrition specialist.

A qualified nutritionist will not only provide you a guide to the number of serves to include from each food group but will also help you and child inculcate healthy eating habits to live a healthier and happier life.

Kanupriya Khanna is one such child nutritionist in Delhi who gives honest, clear and concise advice on how and what to eat. For more information on Kanupriya visit: https://kanupriyakhanna.in/

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