child nutrition specialist Archives - Kanupriya
  • Call: +91 93183 90897

Tag Archives: child nutrition specialist

Categories Other nutrition blog

Parents’ First Month With a Newborn

Parents’ first month with a newborn

“With every newborn baby, a little sunrise rises!”

God’s blessing has arrived in the house and you’re contemplating every little thing to provide for your little one. Hold your newborn’s fingers and step on this beautiful journey.

Caring for your baby

Your baby may be the only one born lately, but their addition to the home is a big change for everyone. Juggling your new role as a parent with all of your adult responsibilities in the first few weeks can be daunting and hard for even experienced parents.

What to expect

The first week is still a period of recovery and adjustment. Not only because of the likely tiredness from regular night feeding but also because one small infant can eat up the hours in a day! Prioritize any necessary domestic tasks and avoid trying to cram too many into a single day.

Feeding and mealtime routines for newborn babies

You can expect your baby to feed every 2-3 hours, around the clock, during the first few days and weeks of his or her life. If your baby is cluster feeding, it may be more frequent. Some new parents are concerned about cluster feeding because they believe it means their baby isn’t getting enough nourishment, but it is normal newborn behaviour and can help you stabilise your milk supply if you are nursing. Newborns should not go more than 4-5 hours without feeding because it can affect their weight gain and development.

Feeding may appear unstable in the beginning, but rest assured this is natural. Over the next few weeks, you’ll want to help your baby create a routine that ensures they’re fed every three hours during the day for the first few months.

Baby’s bedtime routines

For the first month, newborns sleep a lot and nap a lot, spending up to 20 hours a day asleep and no more than 60-90 minutes awake at a time. As long as your baby is placed on their back and a firm surface, there are many places where your baby can sleep safely, such as a crib, bassinet, or Moses basket.

After feeding your newborn baby and checking for anything which may be causing a disturbance, allow a little time to connect with your baby. They will also get solace from nearness and voice.

Settling the baby in a crib

When starting to settle your baby into the crib, it’s significant to remember that they have no context of what a crib is and that they are expected to sleep in it. Therefore, it’s vital to create a routine when leaving your baby to sleep.

White noise to soothe the baby 

Low-pitched sounds, such as rain or a steady mechanical thrum are ideal for use. White noise is most beneficial when used for both day and night sleeping and is kept on for the duration of the sleep. If your newborn wakes up restless, try to re-settle him or her in the crib or, if that goes wrong, repeat the holding and rocking method

Diapers for the little one

You can expect 1 or 2 wet diapers on your baby’s first day of life. This will increase gradually each day until day five. You can expect your baby to have 6 (or more) wet diapers per day after that. You should keep track of how many wet diapers your baby has because this is a good indicator of whether or not they are getting enough milk or formula.

Caring for yourself

It’s also a nice time to be gentle with yourself. It is crucial to recognise and respect the emotions that come with becoming a parent, so avoid attempting to follow ‘pre-baby’ routines. It makes no difference if you spend the entire day in your pyjamas; what counts is that you eat regularly and relax when you can.

Nourishment for the new mother 

Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, leafy greens, protein-rich foods, and omega-3-rich foods like nuts and seeds. Continue to take your prenatal vitamins or try an omega 3 fatty acid supplement, which has been shown to improve the brain development of nursing babies as well as your memory.

The emotional rollercoaster

Parenting can evoke beautiful but sometimes upsetting feelings and memories. There is no better time to seek help if you are having difficulty managing any anxiety, lack of confidence, persistent sadness, or feelings of depression.

Experts to the rescue!

Like many other new parents, you may benefit from the assistance of a lactation consultant, physical therapist, pelvic floor therapist, nutritionist, sleep consultant, or other professionals.

Takeaway

Postpartum care should be a continuous process rather than a one-time event, with services and support tailored to each person’s specific needs. If you are looking for solutions, consult Kanupriya Khanna. She is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

Transform your Grandma's dishes into modern foods
Categories Other nutrition blog

Transform your Grandma’s dishes into modern foods

Transform your Grandma’s dishes into modern foods

Everyone remembers their grandma’s delicious recipes served to them during their childhood days. They were so nutritious and wholesome. They have shown us how to take pleasure in a variety of healthy foods. And so today we will talk about recipes made in aromatic kitchens filled with nostalgia.

In the present day, the taste buds of the kids and adults alike have changed. Children love burgers, pasta, and pizzas a lot therefore, it is essential for parents to add interesting dishes to their children’s diet. The good news is that you can transform some of your grandma’s dishes for your kids. They would simply love them.

CHEELA INTO PANCAKES

We loved our grandma’s cheelas. They were made of wheat flour, jaggery and were grilled to perfection with dollops of ghee. You can remake this recipe by adding chopped almonds, cashew nuts, and pistachios along with some beet root juice. This will help the pancakes retain the taste and flavour and at the same time look colourful. The kids love to try this different style.

CHICKPEAS CURRY TO SALAD

Chickpeas curry was a popular dish in most Indian households. We loved this lip-smacking curry prepared by our grandmas. We can modify it by boiling chickpeas and adding grated cucumber, carrots, finely chopped onions, tomatoes, and coriander leaves and all of this makes the food look colourful and refreshing. You can add shredded cheese to the new recipe too.

POTATO SUBZI INTO CHIPS

This recipe is one of my favourite recipes from my Grandma’s kitchen. I remember my grandma’s potato vegetable cooked to perfection. We can bring alterations to this recipe by half boiling the potatoes, cutting them into wedges then coating them with oregano, mixed herbs, olive oil, salt and red chilli flakes. Bake them at 180• C for 30-40 mins till they’re golden brown. Serve hot.

PALAK PANEER TO SPINACH PANCAKE

Palak paneer was cooked frequently by our grandmas for lunch. It was a simple dish cooked with onions, tomatoes, and paneer. We would fuss over it, and our grandmas used to coax us to eat it. The protein-packed leafy vegetable can be remade easily to suit the modern palate. Chop the leafy vegetable and blend it with pre soaked moong dal, water, and some spices like red chilli flakes, cumin powder, salt and ginger. The batter can be spread into a pancake and cooked on both sides till it turns crisp. Add some cheese or butter over it and serve this delicious snack.

MIX VEGETABLES INTO SANDWICH

Mixed vegetables were usually prepared by our grandmas during festive occasions. The traditional recipe consisted of vegetables like french beans, carrots, peas, cauliflower, pumpkin,etc.

Use some of the boiled vegetables like French beans, carrots, peas, cauliflower, and mash them. Add some mixed herbs, pepper powder, cheese, salt and red chilli flakes to it. Fill them in sandwich bread and grill till it turns golden brown. The tasty, yummy sandwich is now ready to be served.

GOBHI INTO CAULIFLOWER NUGGETS

Cauliflower curry or a dry cauliflower vegetable is a healthy vegetable and grandma loved to cook it for us. It continues to be a well-liked vegetable even today.

This vegetable can be made in a different way that would suit today’s modern tastes. Parboiled cauliflower can be brushed generously with butter, panko crumbs, salt, oregano, red chilli flakes, and mixed herbs. Then bake them at 180• C  till they are crisp. Sprinkle some Parmesan cheese and serve hot.

Bottom Line

These recipes will take you to your childhood days and connect with your old self as well as your kids. Apart from that, these lip-smacking recipes are nutritious too. To know more about the related health benefits, consult Kanupriya Khanna. She is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

4 Ways to Help Your Child Form a Healthy Relationship With Sweets 
Categories Children Diet

4 Ways to Help Your Child Form a Healthy Relationship With Sweets 

4 ways to help your child form a healthy relationship with sweets 

There is a lot of fear associated with certain foods, which are often the sweeter foods: ice cream, cookies, and candy. Many parents believe that these foods are harmful to their children. We think it’s perfectly alright for kids to crave sweets. So, what should a parent do? Give our child candy all day? Or do you never serve them? Not-at-all. There is, in fact, a very happy medium. Let’s go over four strategies for helping your child develop a healthy relationship with sweets.

Where to start?

Let us return to the division of labour. If you’re unfamiliar with the concept, parents are in charge of what, when, and where children eat, while children are in charge of how much and whether they eat. That means we get to decide when and how much we serve these foods, and our children get to decide how much they eat.

Kids notice when we completely restrict sweets, shame them, or create a negative atmosphere around them. They may desire these foods even more.

Here are my four best tips for removing sweets from their pedestal, i.e., treating them like any other food and teaching your children to do the same.

  1. No Limitations!
    When I mention this, I am sometimes met with a look of surprise. “Do you mean I just let my daughter eat all the cookies? But she’s not going to stop there.” But I want you to take a good, hard look at this; is she truly never going to stop, or is that just your preconceived notion? What you discover may surprise you: when we allow children to eat as much as they want of a particular food, it ceases to be special. It assists them in learning self-regulation.
  1. Avoid referring to these foods as good or bad.
    Stop transforming sweets into something they are not: something that makes us feel ashamed or judged when we consume them. When we label foods as good or bad, we begin to assign judgement to those foods. Does eating a cookie make us a bad person? No, but this message of good and bad can be internalised by a small child. Food is food, and we must remember this if we are to instill in our children a healthy relationship with food. Simply call the foods what they are: “We’re having cookies.” “Ice cream is on the menu today.”
  1. Do not use them as a substitute for other foods.
    I dislike using sweets as a reward for eating other foods, or for anything else. I want you to consider the message you are sending when you offer food as a reward: “I have to eat my broccoli to get my candy (yum).” We’re making the sweet seem special once more.
  1. They can sometimes be served with a meal.
    Here’s another opportunity I get a lot of strange looks and stares. However, to put sweets on a level playing field, serve them with a meal. Consider this: when a child knows they will be having a cookie (ice cream, etc.) as dessert at the end of the meal, what are they thinking about throughout the meal?

Getting that cookie. But if we give them the cookie with the rest of the meal, they won’t be talking about it and asking for it the entire time. You don’t have to give them all of the cookies they want, but you do have to decide how many.

Takeaway

If children do not understand when more opportunities for candy or sweets will arise, this can heighten their anxiety, making them MORE likely to continue asking and obsessing over it.

Instead, focus on strategically using language to reassure them that more opportunities to eat candy are on the way. To understand your kid’s needs better consult an expert.

Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

a sustainable diet
Categories Other nutrition blog

A Sustainable Diet For You And For The Planet!

A Sustainable Diet For You And For The Planet!

It is essential that we all carefully consider including the most sustainable foods in our diets for a healthy body, a healthy planet, and a healthy future.

Adopting a sustainable diet can help people maintain their health while also ensuring that the planet has enough resources to feed future generations of humans.

What is a sustainable diet?
A sustainable diet is generally healthy and has a low environmental and food supply impact. Food production has a crucial impact on greenhouse gases, in addition to changing the environment through land clearing and other farming practices.

A sustainable diet takes into account the impact on the environment, the individual, and the food chain as a whole. The following factors influence the long-term viability of a diet:

  • nutritional accessibility
  • relative price
  • Ecosystem protection for biodiversity
  • overall health

Taking all of these factors into account should help ensure that the planet can continue to provide enough food and resources for a growing population as well as future generations.

There are no hard and fast rules about what constitutes a sustainable diet. Some diets and food items may be more sustainable than others, and choosing them can help a person reduce their environmental impact.

How to switch to a sustainable diet?
If a person wants to make more long-term changes to their eating habits, they should follow these steps. They can help a person reduce their environmental impact and improve their health when taken all at once or individually over time.

  • Cut down on processed foods

The production of processed foods necessitates the use of numerous resources. Furthermore, most packaged and processed foods are manufactured in a single location before being shipped hundreds or thousands of miles to a retailer.

Begin by replacing packaged foods like cereal and snack foods with whole foods like grains, fruits, and vegetables.

  • Buy locally

One of the most effective ways for a person to reduce their environmental impact is to reduce the amount of packaging, processing, and shipping their food requires. This can begin with buying local foods, including both plant and animal products.

When a person’s purchases  are closer to the source, they can also seek out and support producers who use environmentally-friendly growing methods, such as regenerative farming, or people who ethically raise their stock.

  • Turn the plate over

A person who wants to eat more sustainably can try to change the ratio of foods on their plates from primary meat to primary plants. A plate with at least half vegetables and one-quarter grains is more sustainable than one with a large piece of meat and smaller servings of vegetables and grains.

  • Reduce animal products

It is not necessary to eliminate meat and animal products if this is not an easy first step. Small reductions in total consumption, on the other hand, can have a significant impact over time.

One simple way is to dedicate one day a week to eating only plant-based foods, such as the popular “meat-free Monday” initiative. Eating less meat and fewer animal products reduces a person’s carbon footprint and may improve their health as well.

  • Plants

Fruits, vegetables, and grains are high in essential nutrients and vitamins and contribute significantly to overall health. They also necessitate fewer resources.

They are a reliable source and have a lower environmental impact than meat and animal products. Plant-based proteins, such as tofu, legumes, and beans, are also less harmful to the environment than meat.

  • Meal preparation to reduce food waste

Food waste is one of the most significant contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. In landfills, uneaten food decomposes, releasing methane gas, one of the most potent greenhouse gases.

A person can reduce food waste by planning what they’re going to cook and eat each week, only buying what they’re going to use, and using leftovers. Another extremely effective way is to make compost at the home or community level.

  • Foods in packages

Packaged foods contribute to waste and the use of plastic. Many packaged foods, such as sugary snacks, are also processed, and as a result, they may provide little dietary nutrition.

Reducing or eliminating packaged foods can help a person save money and improve their overall health.

Takeaway

Anyone considering switching to a more sustainable diet should consider what diet they are most likely to stick to and begin with small steps. Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 18 years of experience in nutrition, can provide expert advice. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

One day at a time!

Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

Categories Dietician for children

Lactose Intolerance 

Lactose Intolerance 

Lactose intolerance is a type of reaction to lactose present in cow’s milk or formula manufactured from it that you or your child may experience. This occurs when our bodies are unable to digest lactose, a natural sugar found in milk. Lactose intolerance affects over 70% of the world’s population. People from Asian, African, and Hispanic ethnic groupings are more likely to have it.

Lactose Intolerance Symptoms

Lactose intolerance has certain symptoms that are comparable to those of a cow’s milk protein allergy. Digestion issues such as belly aches and bloating may be among them. Diarrhoea can also be a symptom.

 A lactose intolerance test, which evaluates blood sugar levels before and after drinking a lactose solution drink, may be given to confirm the intolerance.

If the test reveals lactose intolerance, you will most likely be directed to a dietician, who will advise you on appropriate meals and beverages. To ensure normal growth and development, babies and young children require the right nutrition. If your baby is bottle-fed and has lactose sensitivity, your doctor will probably recommend switching to lactose-free formula milk. Lactose replacement drops, which make it easier for your infant to digest lactose in breast milk, may aid if you’re nursing. For many babies and young children, lactose intolerance is only transitory. Within a few weeks or months, their symptoms will usually improve. It’s safe to gradually reintroduce milk and dairy into their diet at this time.

How Do You Deal With Lactose Intolerance?

When a child is diagnosed with lactose intolerance, the symptoms are relieved by avoiding milk and other dairy products. Those with primary lactose intolerance, on the other hand, have various degrees of lactase insufficiency and can tolerate varying levels of dietary lactose. Lactose-intolerant youngsters (and their parents) should be aware that symptoms caused by dairy products are usually temporary and do not cause harm to the gastrointestinal tract (as compared with celiac disease or allergic reactions, including milk-protein intolerance that can lead to ongoing inflammation and mucosal damage). Despite the fact that lactose malabsorption does not predispose to calcium malabsorption, avoiding milk products to alleviate symptoms may be detrimental to proper bone mineralization. It’s been proven that children who don’t drink milk get less calcium than they need for appropriate bone calcium accretion and mineralization.

Beyond infancy, lactose-free alternatives to cow milk based on rice, soy, or other proteins are widely accessible, albeit the nutritious content of most of these milks is not comparable to cow milk. Lactose is present in other mammalian milks, including goat milk. Tolerance to milk products may be partial, so some people may be able to avoid symptoms by simply changing their diet. Lactose in little doses, spaced throughout the day and ingested with other foods, may be tolerated in some cases, without causing discomfort. Because the bacteria in yogurt convert the lactose into lactic acid before intake, many lactose-intolerant individuals who are intolerant of milk can consume yoghurt. Furthermore, the semisolid nature of yoghurt reduces gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit, resulting in less lactose intolerance symptoms.

Aged cheeses have a lower lactose content than other cheeses and may be better tolerated as a result. Finally, oral lactase replacement capsules or lactase-enhanced milk or dairy products are widely available, allowing lactose-intolerant people to consume some or all milk products without restriction. Because the vitamin D amount of milk substitutes vary, labels must be verified to ensure that each brand’s vitamin D content is accurate.

Lactose-Free Formulas

Low-lactose and lactose-free formulas have no clinical advantages over standard lactose-containing formulas in developed countries, even in the case of acute gastroenteritis, because enough lactose digestion and absorption is preserved, except in severely undernourished children, in whom lactose-containing formulas may worsen diarrhoea and lactose-free formulas may be advantageous. In all circumstances, human milk should be continued for breastfed newborns. Despite the widespread availability and popularity of lactose-free cow milk–protein-based formulas, no research has shown that they have any therapeutic influence on infant outcome indicators such as colic, growth, or development.

Calcium Absorption and Bone Mineral Content Lactose, Calcium Absorption, and Bone Mineral Content

Recent research suggests that dietary lactose improves calcium absorption and that lactose-free diets decrease calcium absorption. Lactose intolerance (and lactose-free diets) may thus predispose to insufficient bone mineralization, a condition now identified in a variety of other paediatric illnesses. The long-term effects of lactose-free diets on bone mineral content and the risk of fractures and osteoporosis as people age have yet to be determined. Protein intake, vitamin D status, salt intake, hereditary and other factors all affect calcium homeostasis, making long-term research necessary to assess the hazards of each or all of these to bone health. Recent research suggests that genetic testing may one day be effective for detecting those at risk of lactase deficiency and, as a result, decreased bone mineral density, allowing for early management with dietary changes or nutrient supplementation.

Summary

Lactose intolerance has been recognised as a frequent condition in many children and people around the world for many years. Despite the fact that lactose intolerance is rarely life-threatening, its symptoms can cause severe discomfort, interrupted quality of life, and loss of school attendance, leisure and sports activities, and work time, all at a cost to individuals, families, and society. Treatment is straightforward and focuses on lowering or eliminating lactose, from the diet or “predigesting” it with supplemental lactase-enzyme replacement. Calcium must be obtained from nondairy sources or as a dietary supplement to avoid indolence.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 18 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advise and the right kind of diet. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

child diet
Categories Children Diet

Using Food Play to Encourage Picky Eaters

I know how difficult it may be to have fussy eaters at home; not just as a mother, but also as a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition. We simply want our children to eat, meet their nutritional needs, and quit being finicky eaters. So, how can we make mealtimes more fun and stimulate the consumption of new foods? Play with food!

Food play has gotten a bad reputation in the past.

“Don’t mess with your food!” 

“Use your fork and spoon!” 

“Don’t spit out your meal!” 

Such instructions don’t help, and I’m here to tell you why.

1.  We employ all five senses to eat, so it’s a whole sensory experience. We can help our children become accustomed to new foods by allowing them to use all of their senses. Touching, smelling, listening, feeling, and finally tasting our food are all important aspects of eating. We eat with all of our senses, which is particularly crucial for children and helps them to become more familiar with these foods.

2.  It’s not just about trying something new when it comes to eating; it’s about having interactions and exposures that brings our children closer to eating those foods. According to research, the more we allow our children to interact with different foods, textures, tastes and smells; the more comfortable they will get with these foods.

3. Taking a bite and eating a new meal can be intimidating. However, touching, smelling, or even licking that meal may not be as frightening. It has been proven that encouraging these stimuli leads to children liking new foods. Allowing children to spit their food out can be beneficial. We’re showing them that it’s alright if they don’t like the food right away, and that they can spit that bite onto their plate. This can help children feel more at ease with new foods.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advice. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

For more information about the same do visit   https://kanupriyakhanna.in/

Categories Children Diet, Nutrition Blogs

Add Zinc in Your Child’s Diet Plan

Zinc is known to be a powerhouse nutrient. It’s an important mineral for fighting off illness, keeping your heart and liver healthy, preventing digestive issues, and even growing muscles.
Zinc is basically a trace element that is necessary for a healthy immune system. It assists with the function, creation, and repair of our DNA – the building blocks for every cell in the body.

Zinc deficiency in children can lead to growth impediments and increased risk of infection. Hence it’s important to include zinc in your child’s diet plan, in order to contribute to the overall development of your child’s health.

How to Get Enough Zinc
Normally, zinc deficiency is due to insufficient dietary intake. In order to meet this need, you need to serve your child a balanced diet that includes zinc-rich foods.

Here is a list of food items that’s rich in zinc:

Shellfish: E.g. Oysters, prawns, crabs, mussels and shrimp can all contribute to your daily zinc needs.

Fish: Sardines, salmon

Meat: Chicken and turkey

Dairy Foods: Milk, yogurt, cheese – especially ricotta

Nuts and Seeds: Cashews, walnut, peanuts, pumpkin seeds

Beans: Green beans, kidney beans, baked beans, chickpeas

Vegetables: Mushrooms, spinach, broccoli, asparagus, kale, onions, ginger, garlic

Your food choices do impact your body. Hence it’s important to prepare a proper nutrition plan for kids as well. However, if you are facing difficulties in making proper food choices, ensure you consult a child nutrition specialist.

A qualified nutritionist will not only provide you a guide to the number of serves to include from each food group but will also help you and child inculcate healthy eating habits to live a healthier and happier life.

Kanupriya Khanna is one such child nutritionist in Delhi who gives honest, clear and concise advice on how and what to eat. For more information on Kanupriya visit: https://kanupriyakhanna.in/

Categories Nutrition during lactation

Healthy Lactation Diet For Mums

Expectant mothers start thinking of feeding the baby well before they deliver. With a vast majority of health care providers/ lactation consultants suggesting that breast feeding is the best option, to be and new mothers have multiple questions on lactation diet. These range from –

What should I eat to produce enough milk for my baby?
• What should I avoid in my diet to ensure that my baby is not colic?
• If I don’t lactate is it alright to give my baby bottle feed?

Well, if you are not lactating, it is alright to give you baby bottle feed. At Kanupriya, we have consulted with many new mothers who are not lactating sufficiently or at all on bottle feed.

Having said that, if you are lactating then it is good to know that breast milk, in any quantity, is wonderful for babies. Some studies suggest exclusive breast feeding for the first six months while some lactation consultants suggest that introducing food at three months maybe alright. Bottom line is that breast milk remains the best meal for the baby for at least the first three months.

What makes breast milk the first universal suggestion is that it contains all nutrients that a baby needs for its growth and development, from proteins to fats to calories and minerals. These nutrients pass from the mother to the child. So here are some sample food groups that help understand a new mother’s healthy lactation diet.
A thumb rule to keep in mind is that when breastfeeding, you need 400-500kcal extra per day. Now coming to the food groups –

1. Dairy Products   Foods such as milk, paneer, cheese, eggs etc. are rich in protein and a good source of calcium. These foods help form Caesin in breast milk, which aids digestion and absorption of other nutrients.

2. Green and Leafy Vegetables:  Broccoli, Kale, Peas, Mustard Greens etc are all rich in their protein and mineral content. This helps boost nutritional value of the breastmilk and the fiber maintains the mother’s digestive system’s health.

3. Pulses and Legumes:   These have high levels of minerals such as iron, folate, phosphorous, zinc, and B vitamins. Rich in proteins and low in fat, this is a good inclusion to have a well-balanced diet for a new mother.

4. Seafood:   Rich in iodine and other minerals, seafood for those not allergic can be an interesting addition in the daily diet. Salt, butter and ghee in the normal amounts must also be consumed to ensure the supply of fat and energy to the mother.

Just as when pregnant, when breastfeeding mothers should be careful with caffeine, alcohol and medication. Hydration through water and other healthy fluids is essential and do not try diets to lose weight.

At Kanupriya we help our mothers plan their lactation diet for the well being of their child and themselves.

Enquire Now!
close slider

    Send Message