Best Nutritionist in Delhi Archives - Kanupriya
  • Call: +91 93183 90897

Tag Archives: Best Nutritionist in Delhi

Categories Diet During Pregnancy, Pregnancy nutrition

Folate and Pregnancy: How important is it really?

Folate and Pregnancy: How important is it really?

Folate, often known as vitamin B9, is an important nutrient during pregnancy. Folate has a number of critical roles during pregnancy, the most significant of which is ensuring the normal closure of your baby’s neural tube during the first few weeks. Getting adequate folate during this critical phase will help your baby avoid neural tube problems like spina bifida and anencephaly. It is necessary for your baby’s spine, brain, and skull to develop properly. Other research has linked sufficient folate consumption during pregnancy to a lower risk of oral cleft lip/palate and cardiovascular problems in babies.

There is also some evidence that suggests a reduced risk of preeclampsia in the mother. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy issue involving the mother’s blood pressure, which can endanger both the mother and the baby’s life.

Is there a difference between folate and folic acid?

Folate and folic acid have a similar sounding name for a reason! Folate is a naturally occurring nutrient, but folic acid is a synthetic nutrient that is added to specific foods to provide the same nutritional benefits. Folic acid is more stable than folate for fortification purposes, therefore you’ll probably see it in your prenatal supplement! For the sake of simplicity, you can consider them to be the same thing!

Food sources of folate:

Leafy greens, lentils, asparagus, oranges, broccoli, strawberries, egg yolks and avocado are all good sources of folate. Fortified foods including cereal, grains, and whole grain flours also contain folic acid.

Hi to prevent deficiency of folic acid:

To guarantee that your requirements of folic acid are met in the event of you becoming pregnant, all women of reproductive age planning a pregnancy, should take a multivitamin supplement daily containing 400 micrograms of folic acid (with vitamin B12 for effective folic utilisation). As previously said, folate is critical during the early stages of pregnancy, so start supplementing at least three months before trying to conceive. This will guarantee you have adequate quantities to support your baby’s neurodevelopment.

Because pregnant women need 600 micrograms of folate/folic acid per day, dietary sources of folate/folic acid are just as vital as continuing to take your folate supplement! Women having a history of neural tube problems in previous pregnancies, a family history of neural tube defects, diabetes, obesity, or epilepsy may require more folate supplementation. If you think you could be at risk of folate deficiency, talk to your doctor or a nutritionist before starting a higher dose of supplementation.

In conclusion

Getting nutrition advice during pregnancy can be stressful, but we’re here to help! If you need some assistance incorporating folate-rich foods into your diet. Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 18 years of experience, can provide expert advise.

Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

Categories Children Diet

Diet Culture Dropout: The Best Feeding Advice for New Parents

I’m on a quest to help you rediscover the pleasure that should come with eating. I don’t want you to miss out on memories of your motherhood or your children’s childhood because of food or eating anxieties.

The good news is that optimal nutrition does not need sacrificing a positive relationship with food. Choosing to focus on supporting your children does not imply that you are neglecting nourishment or that you are no longer “caring.” There’s no way. You do it because you care, and you’ll discover that healthy nourishment for your children is the result. So, where do you begin? How may this appear in your home?

It may appear hard to work for something different in your home when you look at the large picture. Especially, if food is difficult to understand and feeding children is a stressful experience. We’re already inundated with “rules” about how to feed our children and how to produce healthy eaters. Diet culture has penetrated a lot of this knowledge. Does any of this ring a bell?

  • Allow no packaged foods to be consumed by your children.
  • Offer them no processed foods.
  • Before the age of two, no additional sugar is allowed.
    • Limit sweets in your home and don’t allow your kids to consume sugar.
  • Nothing frozen should be consumed.
  • Stay away from convenience foods.

But what do you do if your kids gravitate towards foods that are intended to be “off-limits”?

This is where I see power struggles between children, parents and their caretakers begin, and where food becomes a source of conflict.

Perhaps you’ve seen something similar before?

You want your children to eat healthy meals, on the one hand. You want them to be fit and healthy, with a strong immune system to boot. You don’t want kids to have behavioural issues, and you’re concerned about their physique sizes. You want them to succeed and grow into capable, strong adults.

Diet Culture Influences Common Child Feeding Rules

Food rules can influence how we feed our children in the most subtle ways – things we might not even realise are food rules.

It’s critical to comprehend how diet culture operates, as it frequently promotes a rigorous attitude to food and eating while also normalising these practices as the best way to create a healthy family.

Diet culture has been cloaked in the guise of “wellness culture” in recent years, but it is still an unhealthy obsession with the things we eat. Diet culture has become a mainstream aspect of how we conduct our lives, making it difficult to spot it when it appears.

It frequently manifests itself when it comes to feeding our children, which is why this is an important subject to investigate.

Here are a few instances of how diet culture can manifest itself in how we feed our children:

  • Keeping a tight grip on the meals our kids eat or have access to
  • Allowing children to eat particular meals based on external norms (e.g., “Processed foods are harmful, thus they can’t eat any processed foods,” “Sweets are unhealthy for kids,” “We don’t allow any sugar in the house,” and so on)
  • Keeping your child away from events where other outside meals are offered that you are not comfortable with them eating.
  • Are you worried about what your youngster is eating?
  • Using a “good” versus “bad” lens to describe food
  • Trying to teach your child about healthy eating, food selection, and so on

These items may appear to be “applauded” by diet culture on the surface. Diet culture honours and rewards parents who are overly concerned about their children’s health and the foods they eat.

But how much will it cost? Many families who become enslaved to tight eating rules or a black-and-white view of health wind up with more complicated challenges. Mealtimes are typically chaotic when our children are fed through diet culture. Parents may feel trapped in a never-ending cycle of power battles with their kids. When we try to get our children to adapt to our norms or views around food and eating, this doesn’t allow our children to keep their underlying intuitive eating talents.

We essentially take away the autonomy that we want our children to acquire and grow, forsaking the most crucial components of forming a pleasant relationship with food in order to stay in the diet culture’s safe zones. Please believe me when I tell that as parents attempting to raise healthy, capable children, we only have the finest intentions.

I don’t believe any parent is intentionally attempting to sabotage their children’s connections with food and their bodies.

The goal here isn’t to condemn parents in any way; rather, it’s to recognise the toxic milieu in which we’re trying to feed and raise our children. Diet culture has penetrated every aspect of our lives, including how we parent and feed our children. It’s all too easy for us to fall prey to its enticing hooks if we don’t take intentional actions to proactively combat it. To become a part of the system from which so many of us seek liberation. So many of these feeding methods are ones we were exposed to as children, or that our parents were exposed to, and so on – through the centuries.

It all starts with becoming more conscious of how it hides and lurks in your own home, as well as questioning the norms you’ve internalised about food and your body.

What food ideas do you have that are currently influencing how you feed your own children?

Understanding this and taking the time to honestly reflect on it can help you make a proactive decision for you and your family. Take a piece of paper and write down some of the norms or attitudes you have about food or feeding your children that are influenced by diet culture.

If you’re unsure, write down the first thing that comes to mind. When thinking about this, consider TRUST as a component.

If you or your children don’t trust themselves or each other around food, this can be a key motivator for rules, as rules provide an artificial sense of control.

Fear is what keeps rules alive, so think about what you’re afraid of when you evaluate the food rules that have crept into your home or the base from which you feed your children. Diet culture instils fear and fosters the notion that we can’t trust ourselves or our children. Returning to the basics and learning to live and eat free of food restrictions necessitates beginning from the ground up. Because feeding our children involves more than a transaction: it isn’t just handing them food and expecting them to eat it. (Diet culture portrays feeding our children as something to be controlled in this way.)

However, this overlooks the most important aspect of feeding our children: cultivating a trustworthy feeding connection. This provides a sense of security and connection, and it is in this environment that children can learn to trust their bodies and form positive dietary associations that benefit their general health. Cultivating such trust is crucial to having food freedom as a family and breaking the chains of any internalised food rules you may have had.

Learning to consume and feed your children outside of these dietary restrictions can be quite beneficial, not just to yourself but also to your children’s attitudes toward food and their bodies. This is why it’s critical to be aware of the eating rules you follow, whether consciously or unconsciously. What is the perspective from which you feed your children, and how has that perspective been formed?

When you can begin to study and comprehend it, you may begin to demolish it in order to feed your children outside of diet culture’s confines and structures.

This could include bringing in previously forbidden items or questioning your own dietary guidelines regarding what or how much your children “need to consume.” This may appear to be bending your rules about when particular foods are allowed (for example, many of us grew up with a dietary rule that said we could only eat sweet foods after dinner – but why? Who told you that this was the rule? And what is the point of it?

If you’re not sure if the dietary “rules” you have for your kids and yourself are related to diet culture, consider this: “What is the objective behind this rule?” Is there a regulation in place to provide you some control over a dish that makes you feel uneasy? Taking an honest look at this will help you comprehend the rules you may have around food, as well as reveal which restrictions may need to be questioned and destroyed in order for you and your family to enjoy more freedom with food.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 18 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advise and the right kind of diet for the children. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the greatest dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles. (Children’s Nutritional Needs During the Pandemic:)

All you need to know when Breastfeeding
Categories Nutrition during lactation

All You Need to Know When Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding burns extra calories, thus it can help you lose weight faster after your pregnancy. It releases the hormone oxytocin, which aids in the return of your uterus to its pre-pregnancy size. Breastfeeding also reduces your chances of developing breast & ovarian cancer and osteoporosis.

It saves you time and money because you don’t have to buy and measure formula, sanitise nipples, or reheat bottles. It also allows you to spend quality time with your newborn and bond.

What is breast milk?

Your breasts create perfect “first milk” for the first few days after birth. It’s known as colostrum. Colostrum is thick and yellowish, and there isn’t much of it, but it’s enough to meet your baby’s nutritional requirements. Colostrum aids in the development and preparation of a newborn’s digestive tract for the digestion of breast milk and enhances immunity of the newborn.

Colostrum is the earliest phase of breast milk, and it changes throughout time to provide your baby with the nutrition he or she requires as it grows. Transitional milk is the name of the second phase. Your body makes this as your colostrum is eventually replaced by mature milk, the third phase of breast milk.

After colostrum, you’ll start producing transitional milk, followed by mature milk – 10 to 15 days after giving birth, which will provide your baby with all the nutrition they require until 6 months of age.

Breastfeeding exclusively for 6 months is recommended by experts. Your breasts may produce less milk if you supplement with formula as the production of milk is dependent on demand and the sucking action of the infant.

During lactation, there are certain nutritional requirements that must be met.

It’s worth noting that nutritional requirements during nursing are higher than during pregnancy. The birth weight of the baby doubles in the first four to six months of its life. The milk produced during this time has to meet the growing baby’s needs.

Nutritional requirements also alter with maternal age, which can have a significant impact on maternal nutritional status and milk composition, particularly in teenage or impoverished mothers.

Some points to keep in mind:

1. Iron: Iron supplementation is commonly prescribed to compensate for blood losses incurred during childbirth and menstruation. It should be noted that some women who exclusively breastfeed for at least six months experience amenorrhoea and hence do not lose iron through menstruation during that time.

2. Calcium: Calcium is required during lactation. The regulatory processes of the body change so that there is increased calcium absorption, decreased renal excretion, and enhanced bone calcium mobilisation. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends that lactating mothers consume five servings per day of calcium-rich foods of any kind, such as low-fat yoghourt or cheese, as well as other calcium-rich non-dairy foods, such as fish consumed with its bones (for example, canned sardines), salmon, broccoli, sesame seeds, etc. to meet their calcium requirements.

3. Protein: When compared to calorie requirements, the increase in protein requirements during lactation is minimal. Consumption of protein-rich foods can meet the increased requirements during nursing (for example, one egg, 25g of cheese or 175g of milk). Casein is the protein component of milk that is required for calcium and phosphate absorption in the infant’s intestines and has immunomodulatory properties.

4. Carbohydrate: Lactose is the most abundant carbohydrate in human milk and is critical for the continued brain development of infants. Despite the fact that lactose concentrations are less variable than those of other nutrients, overall output is lowered in moms who are severely malnourished.

5. Water: It makes about 85–95 percent of the total volume of milk. Many people believe that increasing water intake will boost milk production, but multiple studies have shown that forcing fluid intake beyond what is required to quench thirst has little effect on lactation.

6. Salt: The salt content of colostrum is higher than that of mature milk. There is no evidence of a link between salt intake during lactation and sodium levels in breast milk, according to research. However, tiny amounts of salt, fortified with iodine, should be consumed (iodised salt).

7. Vitamins: The content of several vitamins in breast milk is determined by the mother’s levels, and deficiency in the mother might result in a deficiency in the newborn. This is especially true for thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), and vitamins B6, B12, E, and A, thus increasing your consumption during lactation is recommended.

Contact Kanupriya Khanna if you need specialist advise on your baby’s diet during the pandemic. She is a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian with over 18 years of expertise in the field of nutrition and is regarded as one of the best nutritionist /dietitian in Delhi.

Diet in endometriosis
Categories Infertility Diet

Diet in Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue that looks like the uterine lining grows outside of the uterus, triggering excruciating in mild pain.

There has been little research into the link between diet and endometriosis. However, some people find that certain foods either aggravate or alleviate their symptoms.

According to a 2013 study, women who ate more veggies and omega-3 fatty acids had very mild symptoms of endometriosis, whereas those who ate red meat, trans fats, and coffee had more severe symptoms.

According to a 2015 literature review published in Brazil, following a healthy diet can help prevent endometriosis from developing or progressing.

The following foods were included in this diet:

• whole grains,
• fruits,
• vegetable,
• omega-3

Although endometriosis cannot be prevented, it can be reduced by avoiding foods and chemicals that boost estrogen levels, eg. Caffeine and alcohol.

Women with endometriosis may benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Plant-based proteins, lean meats, and good fats may also be beneficial. Caffeine and alcohol should be avoided by those with endometriosis since they can raise estrogen levels. If a person does not eat fish, omega-3 fatty acids can be added to the diet through supplements. A person’s fiber intake should also be increased.

Healthful fats are available in many foods, including:
• avocado
• olive oil
• olives
• nuts
• salmon
• other fatty fish

Eating fresh forms of fiber can supply vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation in addition to providing a lot of vitamins and minerals.

Gluten-free eating plan

Over the last few years, going gluten-free has been a popular diet and lifestyle choice.

According to a 2012 study, after following a gluten-free diet for 12 months, 75 percent of the 156 women who took part in the study reported a reduction in uncomfortable symptoms.

Diet low in FODMAPs

The FODMAP diet involves removing specific carbohydrates from one’s diet in order to limit their intake of potentially irritating foods. The goal is to let the gastrointestinal system heal on its own.

After eliminating certain meals, a person might gradually reintroduce specific foods to evaluate how the body reacts.

For some people, this type of diet might be tough because it requires them to exclude a large variety of food groups from their diet, including
• dairy
• gluten
• processed foods
• added sugars

It’s a good idea to keep track of symptoms in a food journal to observe if they improve or worsen when certain items are removed from the diet.

If you require expert assistance, Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian with over 18 years of experience in women’s health and nutrition, can be contacted. If you need dietary guidance for the same, she is one of the best dietitians in Delhi.

Categories Infertility Diet

Female Infertility Foods: What to Avoid!

Infertility is a growing problem that affects couples who are trying to start a family. A rising body of research suggests a link between female fertility and food. In fact, studies demonstrate that a high-trans-fat, refined-carbohydrate, and refined sugar diet can cause infertility. A Mediterranean-style diet, on the other hand, is beneficial to female fertility because it is high in dietary fibre, omega-3 (-3) fatty acids, plant-based protein, and vitamins and minerals. Let us take a look:-

Carbohydrates

Ovulation and female fertility are influenced by insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. Glycemic index and load are particularly important when it comes to carbs. Consumption of foods with a high glycemic index may promote insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress, all of which can have a deleterious impact on fertility and ovarian function. Insulin controls metabolism as well as reproductive activities; it can influence ovarian steroidogenesis and hyperinsulinemia, both of which are linked to hyperandrogenism and ovulation difficulties. Insulin is also the main regulator of sex hormone–binding globulin (SHGB) synthesis in polycystic ovary syndrome patients (PCOS).

Fat

Fats are an important dietary component that affect fertility. According to a study, a high-fat diet is linked to changes in reproductive processes, such as menstrual cycle length, reproductive hormone concentrations [e.g., luteinizing hormone (LH)], and embryo quality in ART (assisted reproductive techniques) cycles. Furthermore, it appears that fat composition is more significant than fat quantity. Another study found that even a 2% increase in trans fatty acids intake resulted in a substantial increase in infertility risk due to ovulation problems in 18,555 women planning a pregnancy.

Protein

Animal protein consumption has been linked to an increased risk of infertility owing to ovulation failure. As a result, plant protein consumption boosts fertility in women over the age of 32. The difference could be due to the fact that plant and animal protein have different effects on insulin and (insulin like growth factor) IGF-I production. When you eat plant protein, your insulin response is lower than when you eat animal protein. Protein intake, particularly animal protein, was found to be inversely linked with testosterone levels in healthy women. Androgens, such as testosterone, appear to play an essential role in the regulation of ovarian function and female fertility.

Coffee and Alcohol

A large number of research papers suggest that excessive caffeine use may be linked to a longer time to conceive and a higher chance of miscarriage. Caffeine consumption during pregnancy has also been linked to stillbirth, childhood acute leukaemia, delayed foetal growth, and detrimental effects on a child’s birth weight, as well as overweight and obesity in children, in a dose-dependent manner. According to the European Food Safety Authority, pregnant women and women who are trying to conceive can consume up to 200 mg of caffeine each day.

Kanupriya Khanna, a senior consultant nutritionist and dietitian with over 18 years of experience in treating infertility, can assist you in conceiving naturally. If you’re having trouble conceiving, she’s considered one of the top nutritionists in Delhi.

diet elimination
Categories Other nutrition blog

What is the term “diet elimination”?

The majority of diets are intended to assist you in losing weight or improving your health. An elimination diet is not the same as a regular diet. This plan’s purpose is to help you feel better by identifying the foods that make you unwell.

What Is an Elimination Diet and How Does It Work?

Though there are various forms of elimination diets, they all work on the same principle: you stop eating particular items for a few weeks and then gradually reintroduce them one by one. This method can be used to detect food allergies, sensitivities, or intolerances that could cause unpleasant reactions.

“Reintroduction” is the next step. During this phase, you’ll gradually reintroduce foods to your diet while keeping track of your symptoms. Other tests may be performed by your doctor to determine which foods are causing your problems.

Once you and your doctor have identified the items that are causing your symptoms, you and your doctor can devise a new eating plan to help you avoid them.

People with a range of health issues linked to dietary reactions may benefit from an elimination diet.

To discover if certain foods are producing symptoms, consider an exclusion diet, such as:

• Bloating, gas, indigestion, or other stomach problems

• Joint pain

• Fatigue

• Headaches

• Frequent colds or immune system problems might cause brain fog.

• Anxiety, depression, or mood swings

Because this diet is so complicated, it’s critical to follow it safely and precisely.

An elimination diet should only be followed under the supervision of a medical practitioner.

What Are the Health Benefits of Following an Elimination Diet?

An elimination diet can assist you in determining which foods are making you feel ill. For folks with food allergies or intolerances, this might be a game changer.

Food allergies are on the rise, according to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). Food allergies affect around 32 million people in the United States, including 5.6 million children under the age of 18.

An elimination diet can also help with the symptoms of various medical disorders that are prompted by food allergies. Here are a few examples:

• Other gastrointestinal illnesses such as Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal illness that causes symptoms such as diarrhoea, cramps, stomach pain, gas, and constipation. Elimination diets have been shown to assist some persons with IBS minimise their symptoms.

• Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neuropsychiatric condition that affects roughly 7% of children and adolescents in the United States. An exclusion diet was successful in lowering symptoms for 30% of children with ADHD, according to a study published in BMC Psychiatry in 2020.

• Migraine is a neurological disorder marked by recurrent episodes of symptoms, most commonly debilitating headaches, that can have a negative influence on a person’s quality of life. Participants on an exclusion diet reduced their number of headaches from nine to six in a 2010 research.

• certain foods have been shown to exacerbate the symptoms of various diseases, particularly autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. An elimination diet can be used to treat a variety of health problems.

Effects of Weight Loss

An elimination “diet,” despite its name, is not intended to help you lose weight. In fact, for many people, eliminating foods or entire dietary groups makes calorie restriction more difficult.

On the other hand, some people with food allergies who follow an exclusion diet may feel better and lose weight, but this is unlikely to be due to the diet itself.

An elimination diet should be avoided by anyone with a history of eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia, as it may induce dangerous behaviours.

Elimination Diets (Examples)

An elimination diet can be done in a variety of ways. Some plans have greater limitations than others. For example, you may need to eliminate just one suspected item, or you may need to exclude six or more foods.

The amount of foods you eliminate will be determined by your symptoms, probable triggers, motivation, and other variables. The most restricted elimination diets usually produce the best outcomes.

These foods are not included in the famous six-food exclusion diet:

• Milk, yoghurt, cheese, butter, and ice cream are examples of dairy products.

• Wheat-based foods like flour, bran, and gluten may be restricted.

• Eggs and egg-based condiments, such as mayonnaise and salad dressings, are common triggers.

• Edamame, soy sauce, and tofu are all soy-based goods.

• Peanuts and tree nuts are the most common culprits to avoid.

• Shellfish is one of the most prevalent food allergens.

The following foods are typically prohibited on an elimination diet:

• Citrus-based foods it’s possible that oranges or grapefruits are on your list of fruits to avoid.

• a few vegetables Tomatoes and peppers are frequently left out.

• Sweeteners made from artificial sources you may need to eliminate aspartame and other artificial sweeteners from your diet.

• Oils Certain oils and dairy-based butters may need to be avoided.

• Beans, peas, and all soy-based items fall into this category.

• Sugars it’s possible that candy and sweets will be limited.

• Other spices and extracts, as well as caffeine and alcohol, may need to be avoided.

In case you need a professional help, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian, holding more than 18 years of experience in child nutrition. She is one of the best dietitians in Delhi if you are looking for nutritional advice for children.

7 Myths About Breastfeeding Debunked
Categories Nutrition during lactation

7 Myths About Breastfeeding Debunked

The ‘first milk’ – or colostrum – is rich in antibodies and gives newborns an immunity boost while their own immune systems are still developing.

Did you know? Breastfeeding protects your baby from ear infections, diarrhoea, pneumonia and other childhood diseases. Moreover, did you know that it also protects the mother from diabetes, breast and ovarian cancers and heart disease.

Myth 1: Breastfeeding is complicated.

Fact: Breastfeeding is a simple process.

Babies have a natural instinct to seek their mother’s breast. Some moms may require practical assistance in ensuring that their baby is properly latched to the breast initially. For both mothers and newborns, breastfeeding comes naturally after the first few tries.

Myth 2: Breastfeeding is painful

Fact: Breastfeeding is generally not painful. Sometimes it is painful due to sore nipples. Sore nipples can be treated with topical application of certain medicated creams, desi ghee, etc.

Myth 3: Before breastfeeding, you should clean your nipples.

Fact: It is not required to wash your nipples before breastfeeding. When babies are born, they are already familiar with the smells and sounds of their mother. The nipples create a sense of security and familiarity for the baby.

Myth 4: To give the mother time to rest immediately after birth, you should separate the infant and the mother.

Fact: Skin-to-skin care, also known as kangaroo mother care, is frequently encouraged by doctors, nurses, and midwives shortly after birth. Bringing your baby into direct contact with your skin, so that their skin is against yours, is a crucial step in assisting both mother and baby in initiating breast feeding.

Myth 5: While breastfeeding, you should only eat bland foods.

Fact: Breastfeeding women, like everyone else, require a well-balanced diet. From the moment they are born, babies are exposed to their mothers’ eating preferences. It is best to consult a dietitian if a mother believes her infant is reacting to a certain meal she eats.

Myth 6: If you’re breastfeeding, you can’t take any medications.

Fact: It’s critical to tell your doctor that you’re nursing and to read the directions on any over-the-counter drugs. You may need to take medicines at a specific time interval, in a specific dosage, or to use a different formulation altogether. Consult your doctor before starting any medication while breast feeding.

Myth 7: Clingy babies are those that have been breastfed.

Fact: Every child is unique. No matter how they are fed, some are clingy and some are not. Breastfeeding not only gives the finest nutrition for infants, but it is also beneficial to their brain development. Because breastfed babies are held frequently, breastfeeding has been demonstrated to improve bonding with their mothers.

Contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Sr. Consultant Nutritionist & Child Nutrition Specialist in Delhi, with over 18 years of experience in this field, if you need expert advice on nutrition and post-natal health.

child diet
Categories Children Diet

Using Food Play to Encourage Picky Eaters

I know how difficult it may be to have fussy eaters at home; not just as a mother, but also as a Senior Consultant Nutritionist and Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition. We simply want our children to eat, meet their nutritional needs, and quit being finicky eaters. So, how can we make mealtimes more fun and stimulate the consumption of new foods? Play with food!

Food play has gotten a bad reputation in the past.

“Don’t mess with your food!” 

“Use your fork and spoon!” 

“Don’t spit out your meal!” 

Such instructions don’t help, and I’m here to tell you why.

1.  We employ all five senses to eat, so it’s a whole sensory experience. We can help our children become accustomed to new foods by allowing them to use all of their senses. Touching, smelling, listening, feeling, and finally tasting our food are all important aspects of eating. We eat with all of our senses, which is particularly crucial for children and helps them to become more familiar with these foods.

2.  It’s not just about trying something new when it comes to eating; it’s about having interactions and exposures that brings our children closer to eating those foods. According to research, the more we allow our children to interact with different foods, textures, tastes and smells; the more comfortable they will get with these foods.

3. Taking a bite and eating a new meal can be intimidating. However, touching, smelling, or even licking that meal may not be as frightening. It has been proven that encouraging these stimuli leads to children liking new foods. Allowing children to spit their food out can be beneficial. We’re showing them that it’s alright if they don’t like the food right away, and that they can spit that bite onto their plate. This can help children feel more at ease with new foods.

Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian with over 17 years of experience in child nutrition, can provide expert advice. Kanupriya Khanna is regarded as one of the best dietitians in Delhi because of her unwavering commitment to making a difference in people’s lives by instilling good eating habits and lifestyles.

For more information about the same do visit   https://kanupriyakhanna.in/

Categories Pregnancy nutrition

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

Pre-natal nutrient needs, what and how much?

 

“Eating for two” is a common phrase, but what does it truly mean for pregnant women? Although it may appear that pregnancy is an excuse to eat as much as you want, getting the right amount of calories and nutrients is essential for a healthy pregnancy.

The following guide for what to eat, how much to eat, and when to opt for a supplement, can help pave the way to good health during pregnancy.

Counting Calories for Pregnancy

While there are exceptions, many women are shocked to hear that during the first trimester of pregnancy, no additional calories are required. However, by the second trimester, an expectant mother requires an extra 250-300 calories per day. That’s around the same as one or two more snacks. You may require an additional 450 calories per day during the third trimester, which is equivalent to one additional small meal.

Weight gain is natural and encouraged during pregnancy, while losing weight is not recommended. The recommendations below, based on the Institute of Medicine’s guidelines, indicate how much weight gain is considered healthy, based on a mother’s pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). But, as always, it’s important to consult with your dietitian before making any major changes to your diet:

  • Underweight (BMI <18.5): Weight gain of 12 – 18kgs (28-40 lbs.)
  • Normal (BMI 18.5-24.9): Weight gain of 11- 15kgs (25-35 lbs.)
  • Overweight (BMI 25-29.9): Weight gain of 6-11kgs (15-25 lbs.)
  • Obese (BMI 30+): Weight gain of 5-9kgs (11-20 lbs.)
  • Pregnant with twins: Weight gain of 11-20kgs (25-45 lbs.)

Important Nutrients for Pregnant Women

The following are six nutrients that expectant mothers should consume to promote a healthy pregnancy and birth.

  1. Folate

Folate has been identified as a critical nutrient for foetal growth by healthcare professionals over the years. Folate is required for the development of the foetal brain and spinal cord, and deficits can result in neural tube abnormalities. In fact, before conceiving, women should make sure they are getting adequate folate.

Foods including legumes, nuts and seeds, eggs, leafy greens, broccoli, and many other fruits and vegetables, as well as supplements, should provide at least 600 micrograms (mcg) of folate per day. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant or expecting, talk to your doctor about folic acid.

  1. Iron

Iron is a mineral that aids in the transport of oxygen to the mothers’ and foetus’ organs and tissues. During pregnancy, both the mother and the baby’s blood volume expands, and their iron requirements nearly treble. For pregnant women, a daily iron dose of 27 mg is suggested. Pulses, lentils, leafy greens, nuts and seeds, and fortified grains are all good sources of iron, but doctors recommend taking an iron-supplement as well. Vitamin C-rich foods, such as citrus fruits, peppers, strawberries, can enhance iron absorption when combined with iron-rich diets or supplements.

  1. Calcium

Calcium is essential for foetal bone and skeletal development, as well as maternal bone health. A baby will draw calcium from the mother’s stores if the mother’s diet is deficient in calcium, which might damage the mother’s bones. The daily calcium need for expecting mothers is 1,000 mg, which can be met by eating 3-4 cups of dairy each day. Calcium can also be found in soy products, broccoli, tinned salmon, dark leafy greens, and sardines. Also, divide your calcium intake. To enhance absorption, take no more than 500 mg at a time. This vital nutrient is also available in supplement form.

  1. Vitamin D

Though a mother’s vitamin D needs do not increase during pregnancy it is important to maintain adequate intake. Vitamin D works in conjunction with calcium for the development of fetal bones and skeletal system. The vitamin D recommendation for pregnant women is 600 international units (IU) a day or 15 mcg, which you can get from the sun, fortified milk, fatty fish, eggs, or from a supplement.

  1. Choline

The American Medical Association (AMA) has found that choline may help with brain and spinal cord maturation during pregnancy. Choline is found naturally in animal products, eggs, beans and most nuts. According to the National Institutes of Health, this vitamin is frequently included to baby formulae also, because of its significant health advantages.

  1. Fiber

Constipation affects many pregnant women at some point throughout their pregnancy. Consume enough of fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains to avoid it. Drink plenty of water and get between 25 and 30 gm of fibre every day.

Every stage of life necessitates proper nutrition, but pregnancy and the months afterwards entail special dietary requirements for both women and kids. You and your baby have the best chance of being happy and healthy, not just during pregnancy, but also afterwards; if you eat a well-balanced diet and drink enough of water.

For expert advice, you can contact Kanupriya Khanna, a Senior Consultant Nutritionist & Dietitian holding more than 17 years of experience in child nutrition. Because of her sheer involvement in making a difference in people’s life by inculcating healthy food habits and lifestyle, Kanupriya Khanna is ranked as one of the best dietitians in Delhi. (Dietary needs of Children During the Pandemic 🙂

 

Best Nutritionist In Delhi
Categories Dietician

3 Reasons You Should Choose Kanupriya for Nutrition Counselling

Are you looking for a nutrition coach or a Dietician? Contact Kanupriya Khanna!!

In this section we give you 3 reasons why Kanupriya Khanna is considered one of the best nutritionists and Dietician in Delhi.

  • Highly Qualified

Kanupriya is a highly qualified nutrition coach and Dietician. She has completed her Post Graduate Diploma in Dietetics from SNDT University, Mumbai, and has earned her MSc in Nutrition from King’s College, London.

  • Experience

Kanupriya’s almost 20 years’ experience has been at the country’s leading healthcare establishments including Bombay Hospital, Hinduja Hospital (Mumbai), Jaslok Hospital (Mumbai) and as Chief Dietitan at La Femme (New Delhi).

For over 17 years now, Kanupriya has been working with women to improve their nutritional intake to aid weight loss and conceive, and to improve pre and post natal health of the mother and child. She also provides nutrition education to women enabling them to improve their eating habits and those of their child.

  • Provides Effective Solutions

A mother of two herself, Kanupriya understands the health needs and cravings of mothers and children extremely well. To start inculcating healthy eating and nutritious habits for moms and babies, she combined her education and experience with experiments in the kitchen and born was Karamele – a range of healthy breakfast granolas, snack bars, etc. With Karamele, Kanupriya is extending her knowledge and passion of healthy eating to anyone who wants to live a healthier and happier life.

Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist.  But, only an authorised nutritionist or a qualified Dietician will be able to provide you the right guidance and help. And Kanupriya prides to be one of those qualified nutritionist and Dietician in Delhi who pioneers the science of healthy eating.

Enquire Now!
close slider

    Send Message